Banded Overhead Squat Mobility

 The Overhead Support Position is where we need to develop the MOST comfort and stability in the Snatch.  The first priority in this position is strengthening the body for a safe reception in the snatch.  With snatch-specific positions of an overhead squat, the thoracic mobility requirements are very high and need to be trained specifically.  This positional training will allow an athlete to work towards higher level stability and preparation for max load snatching as well as high volume training in the overhead squat. 

We cannot emphasize enough that athletes need to choose accessory movements when selecting training protocols for maximum potential.  Whether you feel confident in your snatch or struggle to simply do an overhead squat, the overhead squat press (sots variations) is a drill that should not be skipped. Mike Cerbus gives us some more rationale and progression for this incredible training drill:
  Overhead Squat Position: "We need to take the time to train our body in the desired positions of support. The snatch is such a dynamic exercise that many times our body reacts different from we want. The position needed for an optimal snatch reception or overhead squat can often be best trained on its own. To truly find your best position, there may be a need to work specific progressions that we teach and train consistently through the snatch variation of a Sots Press.   

  Many athletes and coaches don't recognize the importance of progressions in the support and end range positions, but they are a critical need for proper movement and structural integrity.  The starting point to help understand best positions comes when we break down the snatch into its more basic parts. 

    When only working on the dynamic focus and drills in a snatch, there can be a tendency to miss the necessary steps of building endurance in the positions of support.  Pressing from your overhead squat position promotes your ideal thoracic extension while also developing needed endurance and strength in the shoulder, elbows, and wrist.  This is truly an exercise that can be modified for all levels of athletes, and it should never be overlooked for someone that is desiring to improve their snatch.
Don't forget, we are only as strong as our weakest position! Technique matters, and your mobility and strength are directly related to the ability to maximize technique.